Wednesday, April 1, 2015
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

War yields ‘lost generation’ of college-age Syrians

By
From page A4 | July 20, 2014 |

The war in Syria has had a devastating effect on that country’s university students and scholars, creating a lost generation, according to a recent UC Davis report.

“The war will end but the young people who would be integral in rebuilding the country are being left behind,” said Keith David Watenpaugh, an associate professor and director of the UCD Human Rights Initiative and lead author of the report.

Young Syrians have fled the violence in their homeland to the neighboring countries of Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey. While they have escaped one set of circumstances, they still lack educational opportunities and face discrimination in their new homes, he said.

As many as 70,000 Syrian university-age students are in Lebanon, but it is estimated that only 6,500 to 10,000 have been able to continue any form of higher education, according to the report. There are another 60,000 college-age Syrian refugees in Jordan and 70,000 in Turkey.

Watenpaugh and his multidisciplinary research team have completed reports on Jordan and Lebanon and are finishing a report on Turkey. Their work identifies barriers Syrians face in accessing higher education in Lebanon, but it also identifies programs that are working, such as educational outreach programs by nongovernmental organizations.

The resilience of the young people impressed Watenpaugh, as some persevere to continue their education.

“It was surprising to me how hopeful they are that they can return to university even though they have been out for two or three years,” he said. “There’s a tremendous amount of frustration, but also evidence of initiative and an eagerness to study. Many of them work 12-hour shifts in bakeries, restaurants and in construction and still try to carve out time to study.

“As an educator, I was deeply moved seeing young people willing to work so hard, but we don’t need the smartest young Syrians to be waiters and house painters — we need them to be the leaders of a new and better society. Most want to go back to Syria and rebuild their country and we should do all we can to help them.”

The report argues that young adults aged 18 to 24 — the subset of university students — should become a specific and internationally recognized category of humanitarian analysis and support. Universities in the region and abroad need to consider cooperative efforts, including establishing counseling centers to assist students with continuing their studies, Watenpaugh said.

“I’m excited about a possible consortium of American universities in the Middle East working on this,” Watenpaugh said. “UC Davis already has relationships with the American University in Beirut and the American Lebanese University, and we have been in contact with them.”

A key recommendation of the report is that universities in Europe and North America should build collaborative relationships with universities and educational nongovernmental organizations in those states on the front line of the humanitarian crisis in Syria: Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey.

These relationships can lay the foundation for additional opportunities to support displaced and refugee students. The report also calls on American and European governments to show the “utmost flexibility” in granting student and visiting scholar visas to displaced Syrians.

“All of these policies are within reach and UC Davis is uniquely positioned to show global leadership in this field,” Watenpaugh said.

The report, “The War Follows Them: Syrian University Students and Scholars in Lebanon,” published by the Institute of International Education in conjunction with UC Davis, is available at http://bit.ly/warfollowsthem. The Carnegie Corporation of New York supported the research.

— UC Davis News

Comments

comments

.

News

Food Bank springs for year-round assistance

By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
 
Next-generation GMOs: Pink pineapples and purple tomatoes

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2 | Gallery

 
Dismal snowpack gets one more measure

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

 
Funding sought for slain vet student’s pets

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A2

AquaMonsters open summer registration

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3

 
Woodland Library’s community room reopens

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Museum celebrates Easter with candy-filled eggs

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

Easter egg hunt set Sunday at Atria

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Cancer fighters will gather Saturday for Relay For Life kickoff

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6

Poet laureate emerita celebrates at book-release party

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6

 
UCD gets grant to look at open access to published research

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6

Odd Fellows will host a big birthday bash

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6

 
Tamblyn presents a comedy concert

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6 | Gallery

AARP’s free tax-prep services continue

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A7

 
Round up at the registers for Davis schools

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7

‘Sip and Shop’ kicks off Child Abuse Prevention Month

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A7

 
Pain management lecture slated April 8

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A8

Seniors invited to join new social group

By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A8

 
Pence Gallery: See artists at work during Garden Tour

By Natalie Nelson | From Page: A10 | Gallery

.

Forum

This is no way to run a city

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: B4

 
Get informed on organics program

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: B4

Bicycle bells are my birthday wish

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: B4

 
Tom Meyer cartoon

By Debbie Davis | From Page: B4

Shootings showed need for MRAP

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: B4

 
Program sparks lots of questions

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: B4

Is Davis on the cusp of an evolutionary change?

By Rich Rifkin | From Page: B4

 
Will containers block cyclists’ path?

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: B4

We have no room for another cart

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: B4

 
Groom’s parents overwhelmed

By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

.

Sports

 
UC Davis represents well at Final Four in Indiana

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

Descalso looks back at Aggie days, ahead to new Rockies gig

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Blue Devils drop softball game at CBS

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

Aggies get ready for Hawaii by rolling over St. Mary’s

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
JV/frosh roundup: DHS younger girls soccer squad stomps Grant

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B2 | Gallery

UCD roundup: Nunez powers Aggies to softball win

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3 | Gallery

 
Gibson’s heroics ensure a DHS split at Boras Classic

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B10

.

Features

Spring is a busy time for honey and hives

By Dan Kennedy | From Page: A8 | Gallery

 
.

Arts

 
Fiery bluesman brings guitar pyrotechnics to The Palms

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A9 | Gallery

 
Bluesman and guitarist Buddy Guy comes to Davis

By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A9 | Gallery

 
.

Business

.

Obituaries

.

Comics