Thursday, October 2, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Water, water, everywhere: Features add a focal point to any lawn or garden

0307 water featureW

Water features can be anything from trickling water over rocks to ornamental statues and fountains to ponds and man-made swimming holes. Creators.com photo

By
From page C1 | March 07, 2014 |

By Chelle Cordero
Creators.com

Add an intriguing focal point to your lawn, garden, entryway or even a wall in your home with one of the many varieties of water features.

Water features can be freestanding birdbaths, fountains, hanging wall fountains, cascading falls, koi ponds or even pools. Ideally, your water addition will have running water to keep it fresh and mosquito-free.

When choosing the kind of feature you would like to add, consider pets, children and wildlife, such as birds and squirrels. Be sure to check with your local municipality for ordinances, which might affect what you can install, where and any regulations regarding plumbing or electricity. Some towns require licensed electricians to install the wiring for a fountain.

You can purchase ready-made water features, statues and fountains that merely need installation, or you can design and build a delightful water feature yourself. Work within your budget. Decide where you want the feature to be and what purpose you want for it to serve. Do you want it out in front of your home to add an eye-catching and aesthetic value, or would you like it in your backyard, where the soft tinkle of flowing water will add to the relaxing atmosphere? A pool designed for family dunking would better-suited in a private area, whereas an elaborate fountain statue could be an attractive adornment to the street-side look of your home.

It’s not hard to build your own water feature. After choosing the ideal location, level and dig a hole large enough to bury a small plastic or concrete basin. Pack the soil solidly around the basin so you can be sure it sits level with the ground and no one trips over the edge. Use a small pump, waterproof flowerpot, hose and rocks to build your own fountain and cascading waterfall. You can also purchase a fountain from your local garden store. The colder your climate, the deeper the pond should be to keep it from totally icing during the winter. The bottom surface does not have to be level. It can be dug with a graduated depth.

Even if you would like to eventually add plants or fish, wait a few weeks for the water to normalize and become a hospitable environment. Make sure that you sink a large enough basin to accommodate any fish or plants you will want to include. Be aware of your seasonal weather changes when deciding what fish or flora you want to include. Pumps should not be run in freezing temperatures, and there are fish and plant foods that work best in specific climates. Floating pond deicers can be used to keep a pond from completely freezing over.

Another attractive feature is to hang a chain from the rain gutter of your home and allow the rainwater to drip down into a flowerpot or other receptacle, but be careful not to allow the collected water to stagnate; use it to water flower beds in drier weather.

Water conditioners are available, which will help keep odors down, reduce algae and deter mosquito larvae. Running your pump constantly will help to keep the water circulated and oxygenated. Oxygen in the water is necessary to maintain floral or fish life. Follow the manufacturer’s directions for the pump or fountain, and remember to wipe the pump periodically to keep it free of deposits. It is also important to keep the fountain or pond clear of debris, such as leaves, twigs and other refuse that could break down in the water and clog the system.

Rather than install a traditional reinforced pool for family fun, consider digging a natural man-made swimming hole. Dig a hole large enough to swim in with sloping slides to allow easy walk-in access, and line the bottom with synthetic liner or bentonite clay. Using a small pump will help to circulate the water, but have a certified electrician install the wiring. Place plants in a shallow, rimmed ledge next to the swimming area, and use a pump to circulate the water. The plants’ roots will help to naturally filter the water without the need for heavy chemicals. Meanwhile, the family swimming hole will blend naturally into your landscape.

Comments

comments

Special to The Enterprise

  • Recent Posts

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this newspaper and receive notifications of new articles by email.

  • .

    News

    Davis, discovered

    By Fred Gladdis | From Page: A1 | Gallery

     
     
    Sunder wants to expand opportunities for all

    By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A1

    CalPERS members: Here’s how to choose Sutter Health

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A2

     
    Standing In: Sponge baths, and other perils of the restaurant biz

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A2

     
    At Davis intersections, let’s be careful out there

    By Kim Orendor | From Page: C2 | Gallery

    Oktoberfest features Grand Isle Fire Brigade

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

     
    Sunder supporters gather on Sunday

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3

    Trokanski discusses new project on ‘Davisville’

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3

     
    Learn more about Boy Scouts during upcoming events

    By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A3

    Third-graders face high-stakes reading targets

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A3

     
    Learn how to ride a bike in Davis

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

    Feinstein, Boxer depend on red-leaning Senate races

    By San Francisco Chronicle | From Page: A3

     
    Gallery hosts poetry night

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3

    Parenting advice on radio show

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

     
    Archer event set for Sunday

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

    Per Capita: Tales from the back burner

    By John Mott-Smith | From Page: A4

     
    Sunflower power at the Winters Community Library

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    Tour gives opportunity to watch moonrise in the bypass

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4 | Gallery

     
    UC campuses aim to be more inclusive to LGBT students

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

    Register to vote by Oct. 20

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
    Check out Soroptimists at info night

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    Helping disabled ag workers stay in agriculture

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

     
    Energy plan calls for big renewables projects in state’s deserts

    By San Francisco Chronicle | From Page: A5

    Election programming available through Davis Media Access

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

     
    Yolo County flu vaccination clinics ready for the season

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

    Junior high students invited to math festival

    By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A5

     
    Shelter volunteers take on play time, poop detail

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A5 | Gallery

    Unitrans persists through changing times

    By Lily Holmes | From Page: C6 | Gallery

     
    Farmers Market hosts Fall Festival

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A8 | Gallery

    School spending by rich parents widens wealth gap

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A8 | Gallery

     
    Up for a fun day trip? Take a bike to Bike Dog

    By Elizabeth Case | From Page: C8 | Gallery

    Volunteers are trained to help with train questions

    By Bob Schultz | From Page: A10 | Gallery

     
    There are plenty of fun activities around town

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: C13 | Gallery

    Getting from here to there by buses, planes and trains

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: C14 | Gallery

     
    .

    Forum

    Feeling shunned after tragedy

    By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

     
    Climate change is coming for you

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

    A true vision for peace

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

     
    Drivers, just follow the rules

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

    Let’s fix the park deck

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

     
    ‘Maupin’s Law’ 2.0: Prevention is better than punishment

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6

    Tom Meyer cartoon

    By Debbie Davis | From Page: A6

     
    Choose Archer, Sunder, Adams

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

    Barbara Archer for school board

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

     
    Vote for change on board

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

    Poppenga considers all students

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

     
    .

    Sports

     
    Despite 168 points allowed, PSU defense may not be lousy

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

    Bumgarner, Crawford help Giants slam Bucs

    By The Associated Press | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    Cheung paces Devils past Pacers on the pitch

    By Evan Ream | From Page: B1 | Gallery

    DHS JV runners shine in varsity events

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B2

     
    Youth roundup: Diamonds swing to victories at Vineyard Classic

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B2 | Gallery

     
    Sports briefs: DHS girls tennis goes three for three

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B8

    .

    Features

    Davis robotics team pays it forward

    By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A7 | Gallery

     
    .

    Arts

    Natsoulas to host mural conference

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A9

     
    Wineaux: Picking the last rosé of summer

    By Susan Leonardi | From Page: A9

    Odd Fellows to screen classic Westerns

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

     
    Robbie Fulks will visit ‘Live in the Loam’ on KDRT

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

    Old Macs get new life at art exhibit

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

     
    Woodland Opera House rounds up cowboy poetry, music

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

    Music for brass, choir and organ set at DCC

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

     
    .

    Business

    .

    Obituaries

    Anne Elizabeth Elbrecht

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

     
    .

    Comics

    Comics: Thursday, October 2, 2014

    By Creator | From Page: B6