Wednesday, May 6, 2015
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
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Youths get free screenings for functional movement training

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From page A3 | February 19, 2014 |

The demands and intensity of youth sports are on the rise. Younger kids are training and playing at increasingly higher levels and over longer seasons. And with this increased volume of training and playing comes a greater risk for injury.

Current research shows that movement dysfunction is one of the strongest predictors of potential injury. Physical Edge, a Davis rehabilitation center and gym, is offering a program for youth functional movement training program developed and directed by physical therapist Mat Moore.

“We believe that establishing proper movement patterns is the cornerstone of preventing injury, rehabilitating from an injury, forming the foundation of a fitness program and improving athletic performance,” a Physical Edge news release said.

The program will be supervised and implemented by certified personal trainers and UC Davis interns. The overall goal is to identify functional limitations and asymmetries with each athlete and provide the most beneficial corrective exercises to restore mechanically sound movement patterns, the release said. Once this is achieved, the role of the trainers will be to get the athletes stronger, faster and more powerful.

The initial screening, which is free, will be offered at 9, 9:20 and 9:40 a.m. Sunday and again Sunday, March 2, for eight youths in grades 7-12. The screening will involve three components:

* Functional movement screen and Y-balance test to determine risk for injury for each athlete;

* Vertical jump of each athlete to assess their power level; and

* Corrective exercises tailored to each athlete focusing on: mobility exercises to improve flexibility as well as stability exercises to improve fundamental and advanced core strength.

The screening will take approximately two hours and each participant will leave with a report on their strengths/weaknesses as well as a score for their risk of injury.

Subsequent training visits will include continued corrective exercises as well as exercises to improve the athlete’s power, core, strength, speed and cardio capacity. The training sessions are set up as a supervised circuit and as the athletes safely show adequate competency in a given movement pattern, they are progressed to more advanced exercises by the trainers.

The Functional Movement Systems is used around the world in training centers and rehabilitation clinics as well as by many NCAA Division I teams and professional sports teams. Moore is a certified instructor and teaches FMS throughout the country. FMS was recently featured in a New York Times article; google the article titled “Stanford’s Distinct Training Regimen Redefines Strength” to learn more.

To schedule a screening time, call 530-753-9011 or stop by Physical Edge at 1460 Drew Ave., Suite 200.

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