Sunday, July 27, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS
Male and female hooded mergansers are among the 106 species that have visited the Julie Partansky Pond over the past years. Jean Jackman/Courtesy photo
A flock of approximately forty cedar wax wings warmed in the early morning sun this week right next to the smaller of the North Davis Ponds.
This one was fluffed up and warming in the sun. There song is a high pitched sreeee. Jean Jackman/Courtesy photo
One unusual year, these American white pelicans came to the Julie Partanksy Pond in great numbers right before Thanksgiving. They put on a show with synchronized, bottom up foraging while others preened on shore and some flew overhead, displaying black winged tips. A coyote came to the pond to see about pelican dinner. Jean Jackman/Courtesy photo
The black phoebe is a bird as regularly found at the Julie Partansky Pond. It sits on a low perch watching for insects, pumps it's tail up and down, then flies up to catch an insect and starts all over again. Jean Jackman/Courtesy photo
Cinnamon teal are another one of the species that regularly visit the Julie Partanksy Pond when there is water. Jean Jackman/Courtesy photo
Canada geese and goslings have been a yearly feature in both of the North Davis Ponds. Jean Jackman/Courtesy photo
Shore birds such as the American avocet and the black-necked stilt have been regular visitors at the Julie Partansky Pond each year. Jean Jackman/Courtesy photo
One year, before we had water features, waterfowl nested in the North Davis smaller park pond. They made simple floating nests. It was fun to watch parenting close up. This coot feeds her chicks. Jean Jackman/Courtesy photo
The red-shouldered hawk flew over the North Ponds this week and is often perched on the telephone wires along F Street which borders the Julie Partansky Pond. Jean Jackman/Courtesy photo