Wednesday, September 3, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS
I’ve mentioned other species of redbuds in previous columns. The Western redbud is native across many plant communities, including oak woodlands. My experience has been it does not tolerate much summer watering, but in a low-water landscape it is one of the showiest flowering shrubs. Bees love the flowers. Don Shor/Courtesy photo
Called flannel bush because of the fuzzy leaves (that fuzz is very irritating to the skin and eyes). The showy yellow flowers keep people coming back, but I consider this the Daphne of the native plant world: too easy to kill for me to recommend it. Enjoy the Arboretum plants. Stan Shebs, Wikimedia Commons/Courtesy photo
Called flannel bush because of the fuzzy leaves (that fuzz is very irritating to the skin and eyes). The showy yellow flowers keep people coming back, but I consider this the Daphne of the native plant world: too easy to kill for me to recommend it. Enjoy the Arboretum plants. Stan Shebs, Wikimedia Commons/Courtesy photo
Silk Tassel bush is native to the coast range, including our oak woodlands. It needs some shade here. A very clean shrub with shiny leaves, just part of the background, and then it surprises you with these long tassels of flowers in early spring. Shown here is the variety Evie in the UC Davis Arboretum. Don Shor/Courtesy photo
Silk Tassel bush is native to the coast range, including our oak woodlands. It needs some shade here. A very clean shrub with shiny leaves, just part of the background, and then it surprises you with these long tassels of flowers in early spring. Shown here is the variety Evie in the UC Davis Arboretum. Don Shor/Courtesy photo
Also called Christmas berry, toyon is native to our oak woodlands. A favorite for winter color of the berries, the shrub grows to ten feet or more tall. Toyon can tolerate some summer water. A nice, clean background shrub. The flowers attract beneficials, and the berries attract songbirds. Don Shor/Courtesy photo
Grown for the mahogany-colored bark, the winter flowers and shiny leaves, manzanitas attract hummingbirds and pollinators in bloom. I have seen very high loss rates with manzanitas in the landscape. Water with care, if at all, once established. A garden selection such as Howard McMinn is your best choice for a low shrub. Taller garden selections such as Louis Edmonds can be trained as a small tree. Don Shor/Courtesy photo
Grown for the mahogany-colored bark, the winter flowers and shiny leaves, manzanitas attract hummingbirds and pollinators in bloom. I have seen very high loss rates with manzanitas in the landscape. Water with care, if at all, once established. A garden selection such as Howard McMinn is your best choice for a low shrub. Taller garden selections such as Louis Edmonds can be trained as a small tree. Don Shor/Courtesy photo
Grown for the mahogany-colored bark, the winter flowers and shiny leaves, manzanitas attract hummingbirds and pollinators in bloom. I have seen very high loss rates with manzanitas in the landscape. Water with care, if at all, once established. A garden selection such as Howard McMinn is your best choice for a low shrub. Taller garden selections such as Louis Edmonds can be trained as a small tree. Don Shor/Courtesy photo
The golden currant is native to our coast mountain range in the oak woodlands. Ribes, or ornamental currants, are a diverse group, with some more Davis-tolerant than others. This one is tough! Informal, open growth habit. Prefers some shade. Birds love the little golden berries. Don Shor/Courtesy photo
A number of garden hybrids of Mountain lilac have been introduced over the years. Ray Hartman was from Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Gardens in 1948, and has proven successful in a wide range of garden conditions. Vigorous and tall, even tree-like with age, or prune it as a shrub. Other ceanothus are variable as to garden tolerance. Don Shor/Courtesy photo