Tuesday, September 30, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS
Valley oak is our big native deciduous oak species. The leaves drop clean in the fall, they are drought tolerant and very long-lived. The growth rate is pretty slow, one to two feet per year. The growth habit is open for the first twenty to thirty years, so they cast very light shade. Courtesy photo
Pin oaks and turkey oaks have similar leaves and get pretty nice fall color here. But unfortunately, the leaves turn brown and hang on into winter. In the case of the turkey oak, they’re usually gone by January. In the case of the pin oak, they don’t fall until spring. This detracts from the appearance of the tree. Oaks native to the eastern United States have this problem to varying degrees. Courtesy photo
Milton Hildebrand stands in front of a cork oak he planted from a 1-gallon seedling in 1949. This picture — taken in 2010 — shows the distinctive bark that is made into wine corks. Cork oaks drop a lot of leaves in spring, which annoys gardeners. But they are very drought-tolerant and love our climate. Put the leaves in your compost pile, or rake them to bare soil areas and let them decompose naturally. Courtesy photo
Citrus leafminer showed up in 2000 and has made its way north. The damage is obvious and relatively harmless to the tree. It only affects new growth. Prune it out if it bothers you. Systemic insecticides are touted for this pest, but would be an unnecessary use of poison. Courtesy photo
Citrus leafminer showed up in 2000 and has made its way north. The damage is obvious and relatively harmless to the tree. It only affects new growth. Prune it out if it bothers you. Systemic insecticides are touted for this pest, but would be an unnecessary use of poison. Courtesy photo
A clever landscape gardener in Southern California, tired of paying high landfill prices, came up with this strategy for the leaves at his accounts. He spreads them on the driveway, mows a couple of times, and then rakes and sweeps the chopped debris back into the landscape. Leaves build soil, enhance drainage, and help retain moisture. Courtesy photo
A clever landscape gardener in Southern California, tired of paying high landfill prices, came up with this strategy for the leaves at his accounts. He spreads them on the driveway, mows a couple of times, and then rakes and sweeps the chopped debris back into the landscape. Leaves build soil, enhance drainage, and help retain moisture. Courtesy photo