Friday, July 25, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS
UC Davis undergraduate student Emma Cox works to transfer baby salmon to pens for a salmon-rearing study. Researchers tagged 800 baby salmon to identify them as wild or hatchery fish, and released them into pens on 20 acres of inundated Knaggs Ranch rice-farm fields in the Yolo Bypass floodplain, on Wednesday, February 20, 2013. Scientists with the UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences, the state Department of Water Resources and California Trout are investigating whether the Central Valley's river floodplains could be managed to help recover California's populations of Chinook salmon.
Researchers from the UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences and the California Trout conservation group study salmon growth in seasonally flooded rice fields in the Yolo Bypass near Woodland. Scientists are investigating whether the Central Valley's historical floodplains could be managed to help recover California's populations of Chinook salmon. Photo taken on February 19, 2013.
Nick Corline, a junior specialist at the UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences, gently tips a bucket of baby salmon into a mesh enclosure. Researchers tagged 800 baby salmon to identify them as wild or hatchery fish, and released them into pens on 20 acres of inundated Knaggs Ranch rice-farm fields in the Yolo Bypass floodplain, on Wednesday, February 20, 2013. Scientists with the UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences, the state Department of Water Resources and California Trout are investigating whether the Central Valley's river floodplains could be managed to help recover California's populations of Chinook salmon.
Rice farmer John Brennan talks about rice quality to researchers and reporters. Researchers tagged 800 baby salmon to identify them as wild or hatchery fish, and released them into pens on 20 acres of inundated Knaggs Ranch rice-farm fields in the Yolo Bypass floodplain, on Wednesday, February 20, 2013. Scientists with the UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences, the state Department of Water Resources and California Trout are investigating whether the Central Valley's river floodplains could be managed to help recover California's populations of Chinook salmon.
In winter 2013, a UC Davis-affiliated experiment in rearing salmon on the farmed Yolo Bypass floodway near Sacramento produced remarkable results. In 40 days, juvenile Chinook salmon grew nearly 1.5 inches longer and packed on weight at an average rate of 0.17 grams a day (pictured). Juvenile salmon that started at the same size and were released into the Sacramento River at the same time grew only about half as fast (not pictured).