Friday, April 18, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS
Eric Holmes, right, and Carson Jeffres, both UC Davis alumni and researchers at the UCD Center for Watershed Sciences, set up fish nets during a sampling of the floodplain in the Cosumnes River Preserve in Galt last December. Gregory Urquiaga, UC Davis/Courtesy photo
Jay Lund, director of the UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences and professor of civil and environmental engineering, stands near the Yolo Bypass wetlands. Karin Higgins, UC Davis/Courtesy photo
Researchers from the UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences and the California Trout Conservation Group study salmon growth in seasonally flooded rice fields in the Yolo Bypass near Woodland. Scientists are investigating whether the Central Valley's historical floodplains could be managed to help recover California's populations of Chinook salmon. Carson Jeffres, UC Davis/Courtesy photo
UC Davis undergraduate student Emma Cox works to transfer baby salmon to pens for a salmon-rearing study. Researchers tagged 800 baby salmon to identify them as wild or hatchery fish, and released them into pens on 20 acres of inundated Knaggs Ranch rice-farm fields in the Yolo Bypass floodplain, on Wednesday, February 20, 2013. Scientists with the UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences, the state Department of Water Resources and California Trout are investigating whether the Central Valley's river floodplains could be managed to help recover California's populations of Chinook salmon.
Eric Holmes (in tan waders and green jacket) and Carson Jeffres, both UC Davis alumni and researchers at the UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences, set up to measure fish on the river bank during a sampling of the floodplain in the Cosumnes River Preserve in Galt, Ca., on December 5, 2012. Jeffres, the Center’s lab and field director, and Holmes, a junior research specialist, capture, measure and record the types of fish that take advantage of the early flooding of the former tomato farm. This work can translate to the Yolo floodplains on how fish growth rates change from river to floodplain. The free-flowing nature of the Cosumnes River allows frequent and regular winter and spring flooding that fosters growth of native vegetation and wildlife.
The UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences brings together undergraduate and graduate students of biological and physical sciences and engineering to address issues in the conservation and management of Sierra Nevada rivers. Students work in research teams to produce short videos and written reports using field data. Shown here are students in the Spring 2013 rivers class recording data on the North Fork American River. The idea is to prepare young scientists to communicate effectively with policymakers, the news media and the general public. (At right) Krystyn Hanson interviews wildlife biologist Eric Holmes (center) for her video.