Sunday, November 23, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

A retrospective on 100 Picnic Days

PD 1940 majoretteW

The 1940 Picnic Day parade featured this majorette leading a marching band. Hattie Weber Museum courtesy photo

By
From page C8 | April 10, 2014 |

This Saturday, one of UC Davis’ longest-running traditions marks its centuple event. Will you be there?

Pack your picnic basket — or come without sandwiches. That quintessential UCD celebration, Picnic Day, reaches a historic milestone on Saturday — its 100th. But packing your own lunch is still optional, just like it was for the previous 99 Picnic Days.

* What’s with the name?: From its very beginning, Picnic Day was never so much about the picnic as it was about the day of showing off the campus. Sure, the very first event held at the University Farm in May 1909 was a “basket picnic” affair, as in bring your own food. The campus didn’t have a dining commons, a Coffee House or much else in the way of dining facilities back then, though the university did pour free coffee and cream that day for visitors who brought their own cups and spoons.

The star of the show back then — as it always would continue to be over the next century-plus — was this marvelous experiment in higher education, a new-fangled farm school that would grow into this world-leading research university you know as UC Davis. By 1916, the open house was known as Picnic Day.

* Hot dogs: The ever-popular Doxie Derby started in 1972 on Shields Avenue near the Quad, and moved a decade later to the Rec Hall, now called the Pavilion at the ARC (Activities and Recreation Center). The sheepdog trials have been a regular event since at least the 1940s.

* The first open house: The raison d’ être for the first Picnic Day was the dedication of the campus’ first dormitory, North Hall. More than 2,000 people from around the state turned out. That may seem small compared to crowds in recent years of up to 100,000. But consider this: Enrollment in the Farm School at that time totaled just 18 students.

* Students at the helm: While university administrators organized the first few events, students have been running the show since 1912. Picnic Day has long been billed as the largest student-run event in the nation, and we haven’t heard of any challenges to that claim.

* The parade: The parade dates to at least 1912, when the main entries were prize livestock. Later years featured elaborate floral floats.

In 1987, the first-place float ended up in flames. In 2007, a KDVS entry, constructed with a small helium-filled blimp, floated away.

* Doing the math: Yes, this year marks the 100th Picnic Day, but Picnic Day is more than a century old. The annual event skipped a few years along the way: in 1924, to prevent the spread of a hoof-and-mouth outbreak that led to the slaughter of nearly 110,000 farm animals throughout California; in 1938, due to rain-delayed construction of a gymnasium needed to house some of the festivities; and during 1943–45 when the campus closed for World War II. (The 1946 event wasn’t called Picnic Day but Round-up Day.)

* Famous guests: Richard Nixon, then a congressman, was listed on the program as an honored guest in 1952. In July of that year, he would be selected as Dwight Eisenhower’s running mate; he was elected vice president the following November.

Retired Admiral Chester Nimitz, who commanded the U.S. Navy during World War II, was on the guest list in 1953.

Earl Warren attended at least twice — once in 1953 in his final year as governor of California, and again in 1970, a year after his retirement from the U.S. Supreme Court, when he was the parade marshal. Warren was the parent of two Aggies — Earl Jr. ’52, a retired Sacramento County Superior Court Judge, and Bob ’58, a retired Davis real estate broker.

Gov. Edmund G. “Pat” Brown was grand marshal in 1962. Other state elected leaders have appeared at Picnic Days over the years. California’s 23rd governor, Hiram Johnson, was a speaker in 1916, just months before he won election to the U.S. Senate.

* Rockin’ and rollin’: Strawberry Alarm Clock and the Youngbloods performed at Picnic Day in 1969. Quicksilver Messenger and Elvin Bishop played in 1970. Taj Mahal appeared in 1971.

* Battle of the Bands: Legend has it that the Battle of the Bands began in the early 1970s, when the Cal Aggie Marching Band-uh discovered the Cal Band playing on the Quad after the parade and started blasting tunes back at the Bears in an effort to defend its turf. Over the years, the last-band-standing contest has pitted the Aggie Band-uh against rival bands from Stanford University, UC San Diego, UC Irvine, Humboldt State University and Oregon State University. The Band-uh claims to never have lost, perhaps due to a rule dating to at least the 1980s requiring the finale to be the Aggie fight song. The 2004 battle may have set a record, ending at 2 a.m.

* Moving, and mooing, promotions: In recent years, students have challenged administrators and state lawmakers to a cow-milking contest on the Quad or the front steps of the state Capitol as a way of promoting Picnic Day. In older times, students — and cows — went to greater lengths to publicize the event.

In 1920, student W.P. Wing escorted Molly the cow on a bovine “race” from Davis to Berkeley. It took five days for the “galloping Galloway,” as the San Francisco Chronicle called Molly, to walk the 136-mile route by way of Sacramento and Stockton. The feat raised some protests from folks concerned about Molly’s welfare, but her caretakers insisted that she was no worse for the wear. Later photos of her showed her looking, well, beefy — and healthy enough to bear calves. Her son, Pete, would retrace her journey in 1921.

In 1917, student A.R. Kramer made a 1,000-mile trip by bicycle “to spread Picnic Day publicity material” from Davis to his home in the Imperial Valley.

In 1923, two students, Richard Barlow and Dave McMillan, handcuffed themselves back-to-back and set out on a 72-mile trek to Berkeley. A “Remember When” photo published in the Sacramento Bee in 1976 shows the pair near South Hall as they left campus. But no photo so far has surfaced to show whether they made it to their destination.

In 1951, students pushed wheelbarrows to Berkeley.

In 1972, the Picnic Day committee got some celebrity help in promoting that year’s “Remember the First Time” theme. Says Dennis Packer ’72, who was committee chair: “We got Gary Withem, the keyboardist and songwriter for Gary Puckett and the Union Gap, to volunteer and compose and sing a ditty that we used for radio commercials that went something like, “Remember the first time, remember the first, remember the first time.”

— Courtesy of UC Davis Magazine

Comments

comments

Special to The Enterprise

  • Recent Posts

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this newspaper and receive notifications of new articles by email.

  • .

    News

    Hollywood readies its big guns for the holidays

    By Derrick Bang | From Page: A1 | Gallery

     
    Need for local foster parents grows

    By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A1

     
    Tactical robot decreases officer risks

    By Lauren Keene | From Page: A1 | Gallery

    Couple arrested on drug, firearm possession charges

    By Lauren Keene | From Page: A2

     
    Woman confronts suspicious follower

    By Lauren Keene | From Page: A2

    Bob Dunning: Signs, signs, everywhere a sign

    By Bob Dunning | From Page: A2

     
    For the record

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A2

    Berkeley, Santa Cruz students protest fee hikes

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

     
    Auction-bound student artwork stolen in downtown heist

    By Lauren Keene | From Page: A3, 1 Comment | Gallery

    UCD awarded $100M to lead program to predict, prevent pandemic threats

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3

     
    Breakfast with Santa tickets are going fast

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

    Free boot camp, yoga fundraiser this week

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
    Enterprise observes holiday hours

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    Bell-ringers still needed this holiday season

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
    Give blood and get a free movie ticket

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    Thanksgiving feast is open to all

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
    Workshop will answer financial aid questions

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    Probationers, parolees graduate from Yolo transitional program

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4 | Gallery

     
    Round up at the registers for Davis schools

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

     
    Yolo Food Bank invites locals to run with the flock

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

    Museum announces holiday schedule

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

     
    At the Pond: Stop, look and listen

    By Jean Jackman | From Page: A5 | Gallery

    Project Linus seeks donations

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A6

     
    Swing your partner!

    By Wayne Tilcock | From Page: A6

    Fairfield School enjoys a festive feast

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A7 | Gallery

     
    Right at home: gifts you can use and use up

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A8

    Dec. 10 jeans drive benefits STEAC

    By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A9

     
    Davis Community Church history recounted in Sunday talk

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A10 | Gallery

    Open your heart

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

     
    Bob Hope interview pulled from ‘the vault’

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A12

    .

    Forum

    There’s only one way to fix this

    By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

     
    Students barking up the wrong tree

    By Our View | From Page: A14

    Rick McKee cartoon

    By Debbie Davis | From Page: A14

     
    Heartbroken over treatment of teacher

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A14, 1 Comment

    Google, tell me. Is my son a genius?

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A14

     
    Daryl Cagle cartoon

    By Debbie Davis | From Page: A15

    Cordial political discourse: Seven years later, the thoughts resonate

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A15

     
    Easing the stress during college application season

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A15

    When the computer stares back

    By Creators Syndicate | From Page: A16

     
    How I want to be remembered

    By Marion Franck | From Page: A16

     
    Watch out for holiday weight gain

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A16

    .

    Sports

    Aggie men finish off Furman

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

     
    Upset-minded Lions bounce UCD from WWPA tourney

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

    New, old-look helmets not enough to lift UCD footballers

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    Late shot sinks Aggie women

    By Spencer Ault | From Page: B1 | Gallery

    Turnovers costly as UC Davis loses Classic, 41-30

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    UCD roundup: Seniors play well in Aggie volleyball loss

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3 | Gallery

    Wire briefs: Kings get past depleted T-Wolves

    By The Associated Press | From Page: B6

     
    With volleyball playoff berth, DHS accomplished its 2014 goal

    By Evan Ream | From Page: B6 | Gallery

    .

    Features

    .

    Arts

    .

    Business

     
    Don’t pass up the parking gift downtown

    By Wendy Weitzel | From Page: A13

    Doby Fleeman: Give thanks for our innovation culture

    By Doby Fleeman | From Page: A20

     
    Honey, spreads showcased at open house

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A20

    .

    Obituaries

    .

    Comics

    Comics: Sunday, November 23, 2014

    By Creator | From Page: B8