Thursday, August 28, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

And so the holiday season begins — but how you eat is up to you

By
From page HH5 | November 14, 2012 |

By Lavinia Rodriguez

With Thanksgiving practically here, the holiday season is off and running. With it comes all the goodies that we so desire and that we so fear will make us overindulge.

But with a little planning, the food conflicts that can drain the joy from the holidays can be a thing of the past. We can use a wealth of solid research about why it’s so much better to control portions instead of falling for the same old failing dieting tactics.

There are researchers who devote their careers to studying what makes us eat more and what helps us push away from the buffet. Food-psychology laboratories produce information of particular interest to the food industry, which wants us to eat their products in abundance. But there’s no reason we can’t use this information to gain insight into how we tend to respond to different eating situations so we can better manage portions — and weight.

Some research findings:
* Out of sight, out of mind: The more visible food is (like the candy dish on the coffee table or your co-worker’s desk), the more likely we are to eat it. No problem if it’s food you don’t like, but if you love chocolate and have to stare at a bowl full of holiday M&M’s, you’ll probably surrender. The trick here is to make tempting goodies less visible. Using covered, opaque dishes for candy, and open dishes to display fresh fruit, will encourage the healthier choice. Also, try keeping nutritious foods in front of the fridge or cupboard while putting the ones you want to control in the back.

* Size matters: The bigger the package, container or plate you’re eating from, the more you’re likely to eat. The brain seems to be looking for signals to mark the end of eating. Something about seeing an empty plate, bowl or bag helps us feel satisfied whether the container is large or small. That’s why using smaller plates is so effective. So, when going to that big holiday buffet, put your entree on the salad plate.

* Serve and step away: During party situations, whenever possible, serve yourself reasonable portions and then step far away from the rest of the food. The less you look at food, the more likely you will be to feel satisfied with what you served yourself. Case in point: Me. Engrossed in conversation with a chocolatier at a party, I didn’t step away from the serving trays filled with exquisite chocolates. Result: I ate more than I would have if I had invited my conversation partner to have a seat in another room.

* Slow down: It’s takes about 20 minutes for your brain to receive all the physiological signals that you’ve eaten enough. So the faster you eat, the more you’ll eat.

What’s the hurry anyway? There are few things we will do as often in our lives as eat, so let’s sit back, take a deep breath and enjoy. The more you let your body get the full enjoyment out of what you’re eating, the sooner it will say, “OK, that was good, but I’m done.”

These are only a few research-based tips that you can incorporate into your holiday eating. Use your creativity to come up with others and practice them as you enjoy not just the food, but the people and the surroundings.

Consider the alternative — getting overly preoccupied with weight, food and dieting. When has that ever worked? It’s the gentle, positive, consistent approaches that make for the best results.

— Tampa Bay Times

Comments

comments

Scripps Howard News Service

  • Recent Posts

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this newspaper and receive notifications of new articles by email.

  • .

    News

    Testimony in Marsh trial starts Tuesday

    By Lauren Keene | From Page: A1 | Gallery

     
    School’s back, with gradual return to smaller classes

    By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A1 | Gallery

    New live-work project approved for Del Rio Place

    By Dave Ryan | From Page: A1 | Gallery

     
    Marcy finds her place in the DHS Hall of Fame

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: A1 | Gallery

    For the record

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A2

     
    Russian columns enter Ukraine

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

    Lawmakers approve groundwater management bill

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

     
    Quake is major test for hard-luck city

    By The Associated Press | From Page: A2 | Gallery

     
    Do you have a project for the noon Rotary club?

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    Learn about Girl Scouting at meeting

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
    Low-income Davis homeowners can save money and go green

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

    Employee parking permits downtown streamlined

    By Dave Ryan | From Page: A4

     
    Prospective foster parents welcome

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    Davis Media Access: Get involved in community media

    By Autumn Labbe-Renault | From Page: A4

     
    ‘Art of Acting’ offered at Senior Center

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

    Tai chi classes set at Davis Senior Center

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

     
    Stroll Through History highlights Beamer Park

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

     
    All are welcome at monthly sing-along

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

    Hosts sought to befriend international visitors

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

     
    Museum wants your old Davis High School yearbooks

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

     
    .

    Forum

    Lunch at the big table, again

    By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

     
    Perfectly good playground?

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

    Work on gun control instead

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

     
    Military has too much money

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

    Put flowers in our hair

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

     
    Give cops the ability to protect

    By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

    Don’t let MRAP be a tool for bigger mistakes

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6

     
    Yes, mother’s milk is best

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A6

    Tom Meyer cartoon

    By Debbie Davis | From Page: A6

     
    .

    Sports

    Gould, Shaw won’t dwell on it, but Biggs remembers The Upset

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    No. 8 keeps Republic unbeaten streak at 8

    By Evan Ream | From Page: B1 | Gallery

    DHS boys look to win seventh soccer section title

    By Evan Ream | From Page: B1 | Gallery

     
    New attitude, new stadium for 2014 UCD field hockey

    By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

    Sports briefs: Aggie men ranked 11th in water polo poll

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B2

     
    Dunning picks Cupcake Week

    By Bob Dunning | From Page: B2

    Youth roundup: Judges like what they see from Davis Diamonds

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3 | Gallery

     
    Baseball roundup: Huge inning helps Cats in Nashville

    By Staff and wire reports | From Page: B8

    .

    Features

    Local teacher and artist turns 100

    By Lily Holmes | From Page: A10 | Gallery

     
    100 years’ worth of stories

    By Lily Holmes | From Page: A10 | Gallery

    .

    Arts

     
    Ethereal dream pop to illuminate Sophia’s Thai Kitchen

    By Anthony Siino | From Page: A11 | Gallery

     
    Well-known artist will be juror for exhibition

    By Lily Holmes | From Page: A11

     
    Outdoor art classes to close out summer

    By Enterprise staff | From Page: A11

    .

    Business

    .

    Obituaries

    Margarita Elizondo

    By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A2

     
    .

    Comics

    Comics: Thursday, August 28, 2014

    By Creator | From Page: B6