Sunday, September 28, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Ask the Expert: Casa Verde Designs

Choose quality cabinetry for your kitchen renovation project

Once homeowners have decided to renovate their kitchens, they are faced with many important decisions – the most important of which may be what to do about the cabinetry. At Casa Verde Designs, we work closely with our clients to find the best cabinet solutions for the project scope, budget and needs.

Renovate or replace?
Most homeowners undertaking a significant kitchen remodel will replace old cabinets with new cabinets. A few choose to reface, refinish, paint, or partially rebuild existing cabinetry. This approach can save money and time, and the result may extend the life of the kitchen by years and improve the desirability of the home if resale is in the future. Renovating existing cabinets can be relatively costly and offers the best solution ONLY if existing cabinets are well constructed, and the kitchen layout is working well.

If existing cabinets are not well constructed or if the kitchen layout needs to be reworked to accommodate current appliance and cooking trends or to make better use of the space, installing new cabinets will almost certainly offer the best result at the best price.

Stock or custom cabinets?
Stock cabinets are “ready made.” They can be purchased at big box home improvement stores in specific sizes. Low advertised prices for stock cabinets may be misleading. Options, styles, and colors are generally limited, and construction quality may not be high. “Designers” at big box stores are often trained in computer software, not in kitchen design principles. The resulting cabinetry may not be designed for maximum function and efficiency. Some stock cabinet boxes will have to be assembled before the cabinetry can be installed in the kitchen, unexpectedly adding to the final cost and time line of the project.

Custom cabinets are “made-to-order.” A designer will work with you to put together a kitchen that works in your space and meets your particular needs. Custom cabinets are typically more expensive than stock cabinets (but not by much, considering the quality and flexibility available). Custom cabinets can be purchased from a local cabinet maker or from a cabinet manufacturer and quality and price can vary widely. Most kitchen and bath design showrooms and kitchen design professionals work with custom cabinet manufacturers who can provide furniture-quality cabinetry at competitive prices using materials and processes simply not available to a local shop. Both local shop and manufactured cabinets take about six weeks to deliver to the job site.

Look for quality construction and finishing
To the inexperienced eye, most new cabinets look pretty good. But this beauty is often only skin deep,
and it may be fleeting. If possible, ask your cabinet professional to show you a kitchen that has been
installed in a home for a few years. This will give you an idea of how well the finish and construction hold up to the demands of daily life.

* Look closely at cabinet construction and ask to see written specifications on materials used. Construction details should be clear and explicit in any bid you receive. Wood grains should be selected and matched with care. If you are using a local shop, be sure to ask if they make their own doors from material sourced from the same place as the cabinet boxes. The same wood species (maple, for example) may have different characteristics if sourced from different regions of the country.

* Examine drawer boxes carefully. High quality cabinets are made from ¾” material and joints will be
dovetailed, not butt-joined. Drawer glides should move smoothly. Full extension and soft-close glides are often not included in lower-quality cabinets.

* How are the cabinet interiors finished? A high quality laminate will provide many years of wear and ease of cleaning, in contrast to raw interiors. Is shelving adjustable and sturdy enough to hold heavy items like plates?
Be sure to ask about paints and finishes. A painted cabinet that has a heat-set varnish will be far more durable than one with just a sprayed finish. Wood finishes should be smooth, with an even and consistent sheen. In stained woods, color variation should be consistent with the natural variation of the wood species. Wood finishes that seem dry, uneven, or blotchy are not high quality finishes and will not look attractive after a while.

Comments

comments

Special to The Enterprise

.

News

UCD’s Tercero hopes for platinum LEED certification

By Dave Jones | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Relief, gratitude follow Marsh guilty verdict

By Lauren Keene | From Page: A1 | Gallery

Janet Wagner bids farewell to Sutter Davis

By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Nolan says he’ll keep an open mind

By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A1 | Gallery

Common Core: A new way to learn

By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Standing In: Facing my fears in Oregon (and barely surviving)

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A2

A welcome challenge

By Enterprise staff | From Page: C2

 
For the record

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A2

Cool Davis: working on local solutions to global warming

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: C2

 
More rain dampens huge California wildfire

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

Brown vetoes $100 million boost for UC, Cal State

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

 
Learn about elections at Connections Café

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

All voices welcome at Oct. 1 sing-along

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Meet Poppenga for coffee on Sunday

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

Locals invited to join worldwide LDS conference

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3

 
Bucks for Ducks raises funds for Yolo Basin Foundation

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A3 | Gallery

A winning combination: video games + science

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Word association: What comes to mind when you hear the word Davis?

By Enterprise staff | From Page: C3 | Gallery

Public invited to free summit on aging

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Snapshot: The art of the matter

By Enterprise staff | From Page: C3

Nursery school plans rummage sale

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Yolo Hospice offers support through the grieving process

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

Three microbreweries featured at Rotary Oktoberfest

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4 | Gallery

 
Eernisse, Partida honored as Women of the Year

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4 | Gallery

 
Museum wants your old Davis High School yearbooks

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

Davis Community Meals needs cooks

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

 
Study examines why mail ballots are rejected

By Jeffrey Day | From Page: A5

Gold STARS for UCD’s West Village

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A5

 
Project Linus seeks donations

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

Homecoming fun is no myth

By Wayne Tilcock | From Page: A5 | Gallery

 
Students invited to apply for Blue & White grants

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

Volunteers sought to make veggie bags

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A5

 
Where did Common Core standards come from?

By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A6

Farm to Fork movement thrives locally

By Elizabeth Case | From Page: C6 | Gallery

 
Maher replaces Wagner as Sutter Davis CEO

By Anne Ternus-Bellamy | From Page: A7

The ‘condensed’ version

By Dave Jones | From Page: A8

 
Snapshot: Recycling made easy

By Enterprise staff | From Page: C9

 
Mike Nolan, at a glance

By Jeff Hudson | From Page: A9

Snapshot: Science is fun at Explorit

By Enterprise staff | From Page: C11

 
Davis residents benefit from active service organizations

By Rachel Uda | From Page: C12 | Gallery

Davis Media Access brings community TV, radio

By Autumn Labbe-Renault | From Page: C14 | Gallery

 
Snapshot: Ban the bag

By Enterprise staff | From Page: C16

 
.

Forum

She just wants to get married

By Creators Syndicate | From Page: B5

 
Monte Wolverton cartoon

By Debbie Davis | From Page: A12

When does she graduate from home?

By Creators Syndicate | From Page: A14

 
I return to the mountains and memories of Mom

By Marion Franck | From Page: A14

There’s no pill to get younger

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A14

 
Love comes in all colors — and yes, even in black

By Debra DeAngelo | From Page: A14

Archer, Adams best qualified

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A16

 
And another academic year begins …

By Our View | From Page: A16

They’re consensus-builders

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A16Comments are off for this post

 
Sunder for school board

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A17

Spacious mothering revisited

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A17 | Gallery

 
At the Pond: Thanks, activists

By Jean Jackman | From Page: A18 | Gallery

 
.

Sports

 
Walker draws coaches’ praise after solid performance

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

Tale of two halves does in UC Davis, 37-14

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Elk Grove spoils DHS football Homecoming

By Thomas Oide | From Page: B1 | Gallery

Depth comes through for Blue Devil harriers at Stanford

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Elk Grove overwhelms Devil JV footballers

By Spencer Ault | From Page: B3

 
UCD roundup: Scoreless ties for both Aggie soccer teams

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B4 | Gallery

 
.

Features

.

Arts

.

Business

 
New sick leave law: Don’t worry; you’ll feel better

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A13

Stocks end rocky week with a surge

By The Associated Press | From Page: A15

 
Activist investor pushes Yahoo to buy rival AOL

By The Associated Press | From Page: A15

 
.

Obituaries

Michael Allen Hanks Baxter

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A4

 
.

Comics

Comics: Sunday, September 28, 2014

By Creator | From Page: B8