Wednesday, September 17, 2014
YOLO COUNTY NEWS
99 CENTS

Disability doesn’t stop Hess from hitting a bullseye

By
From page B1 | December 15, 2013 |

Despite how it may seem in popular culture, there is a lot more to archery than just aim and fire.

“Every young kid these days wants to be Katniss Everdeen from ‘The Hunger Games,’ ” says Davis resident D’arce Hess. “But there’s a lot more to it.”

Competing for Team USA, Hess was an alternate at the London Paralympics last summer, and captured a bronze medal at the 2011 Para Pan-American Games.

Hess is disabled due to her spina bifida, a condition that occurs when the spinal cord does not form properly. However, though she is considered disabled, Hess often competes alongside some of the world’s top archers in competitions.

At her most recent competition, the World Archery Para Championships last month in Bangkok, Thailand, Hess’ three-person team won a silver medal in the compound women’s category.

At that event, Hess and her American teammates shot compound bows — modern bows that use a levering system — at an 80-centimeter target from 50 meters away.

The face of the target looks like a classic bullseye, with 10 rings. Each pair of two rings is one color, with each color awarding an archer a different amount of points when it is hit. The point values range from 10 (bullseye) down to one.

Each team of three archers fires 144 arrows at the target, and the trio with the higher score wins the head-to-head match.

In Bangkok, Hess and teammates Martha Chavez (from Lemoore) and Ashlee Sheppard (San Francisco) narrowly dropped a final matchup, 214-197, to the defending champion Russian squad.

Hess credits her straight shooting to good coaching and a ton of practice:

“I have been very fortunate to be able to work with national team coaches for the past three years, and it has really helped me.”

In fact, the toughest obstacle Hess faces isn’t getting her arrow to stick in the middle of the target, it’s raising the funds she needs to travel to events.

“At many of the big tournaments, travel costs can get expensive, so my biggest challenge has been financial,” Hess explains.

Outside of the range, Hess is a software developer, or in her words, “a computer geek for a living.” The well-rounded  archer graduated from college with a major in music and enjoys playing the clarinet, harp and tuba.

Comments

comments

.

News

 
Rainbow City revival plans, one meeting at a time

By Dave Ryan | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Learn about youth leadership program on Sept. 28

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

Sign up now for free Community Yard Sale

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
AAUW hosts conversation with Gilardi

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Master Gardeners will answer questions Sunday

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

Storyteller will draw on music, dance

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Show off your electric vehicles on Sunday

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A3

 
Sign up soon for a new year of Writing Buddies

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4 | Gallery

Register to vote by Oct. 20

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Free introductory yoga, chanting workshop offered

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

Saylor meets constituents at Peet’s

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Rotary seeks project requests

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

.

Forum

Tom Meyer cartoon

By Debbie Davis | From Page: A6

 
Mental-health treatment lacking

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

Braly’s column lightens the heart

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

 
Bicycle bells needed for safety

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

Are we going to wait until someone here dies?

By Rich Rifkin | From Page: A6

 
Firefighters went above, beyond

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

Grocery bags are biohazards

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

 
Can’t we work collaboratively?

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

Please vaccinate your children

By Letters to the Editor | From Page: A6

 
.

Sports

Devils go the distance to triumph at Chico

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
UCD women take third at elite golf event

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

Aggie men stay in 10th to finish St. Mary’s Invite

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B1

 
Formidable UCD defense melts Hornets

By Bruce Gallaudet | From Page: B1 | Gallery

Sounders win U.S. Open Cup in overtime

By Staff and wire reports | From Page: B2

 
AYSO roundup: Ultra Violet illuminates a victory

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B2 | Gallery

Diamondbacks slam Giants

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2 | Gallery

 
Baseball roundup: Peavy, Posey lead Giants past Arizona

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2 | Gallery

Legacy roundup: Gunners get a win over Woodland

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3 | Gallery

 
Alliance roundup: Soccer success comes on the road and at home

By Enterprise staff | From Page: B3 | Gallery

 
.

Features

Name Droppers: Bamforth leads international brewing institute

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4 | Gallery

 
Name Droppers: UC Davis announces eight new fellows

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A7

Just desserts? A sweet treat is worth the effort

By Julie Cross | From Page: A10

 
.

Arts

Apply now for Davis Community Idol

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A4

 
Nine Davis artists chosen to show in KVIE Art Auction

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9

Sacred Harp singers will gather

By Special to The Enterprise | From Page: A9 | Gallery

 
Classic ‘Hello, Dolly!’ wows at Woodland Opera House

By Bev Sykes | From Page: A9 | Gallery

 
Davis students prepare dishes for Empty Bowls fundraiser

By Enterprise staff | From Page: A9 | Gallery

.

Business

.

Obituaries

.

Comics